Surost (Homemade Farm Cheese)

September 9, 2016
Surost (Norwegian Farm Cheese made from Sour Milk)

Surost (Norwegian Farm Cheese made from Sour Milk)Following a magnificent seter feast filled with Sonja’s homemade products of cheese, cream, jams and cured meat, Sonja shared her recipe for surost.

Surost is a farmhouse cheese made from fresh cow’s milk which has been left to sit overnight in a warm spot to allow for curdling. The milk takes on a slightly sour taste, hence the name ‘sur’ ost. When it is ready, Sonja takes some of the sour milk from the container into a large pot and places the pot into a water bath on the stove. Within a short time, the curds separate from the whey and are placed in a colander where the whey continues to strain out.

This process is very simple and very effective. The cheese is similar to cottage cheese, yet with a tad more tanginess that comes from the milk being sour. I debated whether to provide an alternative recipe using pasteurised milk, but this simply would not be the same since pasteurised milk can not be left to sour. True surost must be made out of soured milk. You can, however, make a simple farm cheese with pasteurised milk by adding an acid to it, such as vinegar, while you heat it directly in a pot over the stove. A good recipe for this can be found from the Nourished Kitchen.

Norsk Seterliv & Sur-Ost (Mountain Farm Cottage Cheese) Norsk Seterliv & Sur-Ost (Mountain Farm Cottage Cheese) Norsk Seterliv & Sur-Ost (Mountain Farm Cottage Cheese) Norsk Seterliv & Sur-Ost (Mountain Farm Cottage Cheese) Norsk Seterliv & Sur-Ost (Mountain Farm Cottage Cheese)A Norwegian Seter {Mountain Farm Life & Food}

Surost

Ingredients:

  • 4-8 litres (∼1-2 gallons) fresh, raw cow’s milk

Sonja starts with a 20 litre or 5 gallon milk container full of raw cow’s milk, however, you can start with much less, around 4 litres or 1 gallon of milk. Place the milk container in a warm spot and let it sit overnight, without stirring. When the milk has curdled, place all of it into a large pot.

Over medium-low heat, heat an even larger pot (one that is big enough for the pot with the milk to fit in) filled approximately 3/4 of the way with water.  The water should have a slow simmer. Place the pot with the milk inside the water bath. Be careful as some of the hot water may spill over, but ideally, you want the water to be as close to the top of the pot as possible.

With a slotted spoon, carefully fold the curds over once and awhile.  The process should take around 15-30 minutes. When the curds have completely separated, remove them with the slotted spoon into a colander that is placed inside a large bowl. Remove any whey (liquid) which has strained into the bowl and let the curds stand for about an hour until all the whey has run out.

Enjoy the surost on top of bread, with jams or make Ystingsoll, a dish which combines sour cream, prim, whole milk and surost.


Read more about Sonja, her family Seter (Mountain Farm) and her homemade products here.

A Norwegian Seter {Mountain Farm Life & Food}

 

 

 

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4 Comments

  • Reply A Norwegian Seter {Mountain Farm Life} - North Wild KitchenNorth Wild Kitchen September 15, 2016 at 3:30 pm

    […] some time. Sonja continues to fill the table with what seems like an endless supply of delicacies. Cottage cheese (sur-ost), sour cream (rømme), prim, kneeding cheese (knåost/trøgost), cooked cheese (kokeost), […]

  • Reply Rømmegrøt with Homemade Sour Cream - North Wild KitchenNorth Wild Kitchen September 19, 2016 at 1:05 pm

    […] Sonja treated me to a banquet of homemade delights with various cheeses (including her recipe for farm cheese), fruit jams, and her homemade rømmegrøt made from her own sour cream using her cow’s […]

  • Reply Kirsty September 29, 2016 at 3:42 am

    Greetings from Australia! 🙂 I love reading about the transformation of milk into cheese. I have only just begun my cheesemaking journey, only recently having made a beautiful batch of ricotta using pasteurised milk. If I get my hands on some fresh raw milk I’ll have to give this surost recipe a try. Mega congrats on winning the Saveur Blog of the year, well done!!! 🙂

    • Reply nevada September 30, 2016 at 1:25 pm

      Hi Kirsty. Sounds like you are are well on your way to mastering cheesemaking! I also hope to one day start making and ageing a few types here on the farm. Let me know if you try the surost and best of luck with the rest of your cheesemaking! 🙂

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